Heraldry

Overhead Units
​"Overhead" units of the Mississippi Army National Guard are those managed directly by the JFH-MS staff, outside the Major Subordinate Command structure that provides supervisory oversight over the majority of MSARNG units.
 
The 1984th Support Detachment and the Mississippi Medical Detachment and currently carry no heraldic authorizations, and assigned Soldiers wear the SSI and DUI of the Joint Force Headquarters, Mississippi Army National Guard.
 
 

​154th Regiment

The 154th Regiment is the MSARNG's Regimental Training Institute. Soldiers of the 154th wear the SSI of the Army National Guard Schools and the DUI of the 154th Regiment.

Organizational Colors

The unit's organizational colors are the Coat of Arms on with a background color based on branch as defined by Army Regulation 840-10: Flags, Guidons, Streamers, Tabards, and Automobile and Aircraft Plates.

Shoulder Sleeve Insignia

Description

On a shield divided horizontally blue, yellow and red with a 1/8 inch (.32cm) black border 2 inches (5.08cm) in width and 2 1/2 inches (6.35cm) in height overall, a black silhouette of the minuteman.
 

Symbolism

Blue, yellow and red are adapted from the insignia of Training and Doctrine Command and reflect the association of the Army National Guard Schools with the organization. Black denotes solidity and dependability; the silhouetted statue is associated with the National Guard.
 

Background

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 27 Oct 1997. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-834)

Distinctive Unit Insignia

Description

A silver color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches (2.86cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Azure, a pair of tilting spears in saltier, Argent. Attached below the shield a silver scroll inscribed "FIRM TO MY TRUST" in blue letters.
 

Symbolism

Blue is the color for Infantry and indicates the unit's origin. The functions of the Regiment are allegorically symbolized by the crossed spears heraldically representing dexterity, nimbleness of wit and ability to pierce, they being weapons of the medieval times.
 

Background

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved on 21 Apr 1943, for the 154th Infantry Regiment. On 5 Nov 1975, it was rescinded. The insignia was reinstated and redesignated for the 154th Regiment on 29 Jul 1999.

Coat of Arms

Blazon

Shield: Azure, a pair of tilting spears in saltire, Argent.
 
Crest: That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Mississippi Army National Guard: On a wreath of the colors Argent and Gules, a slip of magnolia full flower with leaves Proper behind a trident Sable. Motto: FIRM TO MY TRUST.
 

Symbolism

Shield: Blue is the color for Infantry and indicates the unit's origin. The functions of the Regiment are allegorically symbolized by the crossed spears heraldically representing dexterity, nimbleness of wit and ability to pierce, they being weapons of medieval times.
 
Crest: The crest is that of the Mississippi Army National Guard.
 

Background

The coat of arms was originally approved for the 154th Infantry Regiment on 21 Apr 1943. It was rescinded on 5 Nov 1975. The coat of arms was reinstated and redesignated for the 154th Regiment on 29 Jul 1999.
 

MSARNG Recruiting & Retention Battalion

Soldiers of the MSARNG R&R Battalion wear the SSI of the Army National Guard Recruiting and Retention Force and the DUI of JFH-MS.

Organizational Colors

The unit's organizational colors are the Shoulder Sleeve Insignia with a background color based on branch as defined by Army Regulation 840-10: Flags, Guidons, Streamers, Tabards, and Automobile and Aircraft Plates.

Shoulder Sleeve Insignia

Description

On a blue isosceles triangle with all angles rounded, fifty-four (54) white stars around the circumference, surmounted by a red triangle edged with a 1/32 inch (.08 cm) white border, bearing a white image of the Minute Man statue by Daniel French, facing to the left, shaded and detailed silver gray, all within a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) red border. Attached below two red vertical stacked scrolls edged with a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) red border and a 1/32 inch (.08 cm) blue border between the scrolls and inscribed on top “NATIONAL GUARD” and on the bottom “RECRUITING & RETENTION” in blue letters. Overall dimensions are 3 1/2 inches (8.89 cm) in width and 4 3/16 inches (11.12 cm) in length.
 

Symbolism

Red, white, and blue are the national colors. The 54 stars denote the existence of the Army National Guard in all 50 states, 3 territories, and the District of Columbia. The Minute Man symbolizes the Army National Guard, the oldest component of the United States Armed Forces. The triangle signifies protection, alluding to the Army National Guard Recruitment and Retention Forces’ function to provide and maintain military strength for national defense.
 

Background

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 12 October 2007. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-945)
 

Army National Guard Training Center Garrison Command - Mississippi

The ARNG Training Center Garrison Command-Mississippi is the combined organization responsible for the administration of Camps Shelby and McCain. All ARNG Garrison Commands share the same SSI and DUI, with a minor modification to the organizational color. Wear of the SSI/DUI was approved by the Adjutant General of Mississippi on April 4, 2012.

Organizational Colors

The unit's organizational colors are the Shoulder Sleeve Insignia with a background color based on branch as defined by Army Regulation 840-10: Flags, Guidons, Streamers, Tabards, and Automobile and Aircraft Plates.

Shoulder Sleeve Insignia

Description

A triangular cloth insignia point down 2 5/8 inches (6.67 cm) in height by 3 inches (7.62 cm) in width, with a tricolored background that is yellow to the top, ultramarine blue to the left and scarlet to the right. Centered on the triangle a Brittany blue disc with the image of the Minute Man Statue by Daniel French in bronze encircled by an ultramarine blue annulet with thirteen white stars and a narrow yellow border; all within a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) olive drab border.
 

Symbolism

The three colors refer to the basic combat arms and also refer to the components of the “One Army” concept: Active Army, Army Reserve and Army National Guard, reflecting the association with Training Centers. The central disc with the representation of the Minute Man statue and the thirteen stars recall the beginnings of our country and its citizen soldiers.
 

Background

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 1 November 2011.(TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-1066)

Distinctive Unit Insignia

Description

A silver color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a heptagon divided by three colors, yellow to top, blue to the left and red to the right. Centered on the heptagon a silhouetted figure of a Minute Man in black. Attached to the sides and base of the heptagon is a black scroll inscribed “WARRIORS SERVING WARRIORS” in silver letters.
 

Symbolism

Blue, yellow and scarlet are adapted from the insignia of the Training and Doctrine Command and reflect the association of the Army National Guard Schools with the organization. Black denotes solidity and dependability. The silhouetted statue is associated with the National Guard.
 

Background

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 1 November 2011.
 

972d Judge Advocate Detachment

Soldiers of the 972d wear the SSI of the Trial Defense Service and the DUI of JFH-MS. The unit is not eligible for heraldic entitlements.

Shoulder Sleeve Insignia

Description

On a shield-shaped embroidered device 3 1/4 inches (8.26 cm) in height and 2 3/4 inches (6.99 cm) in width overall blazoned: Azure, a sword erect supporting a pair of scales Or, surmounted by a glory of six pommels Argent, bearing a mullet of the field, all entoured by a bordure Gules.
 

Symbolism

The shield-shaped patch reflects the nature of legal defense work. The sword supporting scales of justice represents the unit’s mission to defend soldiers at courts-martial and separations boards; seeking justice for all soldiers. The sword also signifies that Trial Defense Service personnel are soldiers as well as lawyers. The glory, mullet, and the red border are adapted from the Department of the Army Staff Support patch previously authorized for wear by the Trial Defense Service, and provides a historical link to its organizational heritage.
 

Background

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 17 August 2006. It was amended to correct the height on 21 September 2012. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-896)
 

Detachment 16, Operational Support Airlift Command

Soldiers of Det. 16 OSA were approved to wear the Shoulder Sleeve Insignia and Distinctive Unit Insignia of the National Guard Operational Support Airlift Command by the Adjutant General of Mississippi on 27 September 2013. The unit is not eligible for it's own heraldic entitlements.

Shoulder Sleeve Insignia

Description

On a blue shield with a 1/8 inch (.32cm) yellow border, 3 inches (7.62cm) in height and 2 1/4 inches (5.72cm) in width overall, a white mullet charged with a red pentagon one point down, encircled by a blue annulet counterchanged.
 

Symbolism

Ultramarine blue is the primary color associated with aviation. The star symbolizes excellence, authority and command. It is combined with an annulet representing complete service and total readiness. The pentagon refers to the Command's location in the National Capital Area. Red, white and blue are our national colors.
 

Background

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the U.S. Army Operational Support Airlift Command on 1 Oct 1992. It was redesignated for the Army National Guard Operational Support Airlift Command on 1 Sep 1994. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-799)

Distinctive Unit Insignia

Description

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86cm) in height overall, consisting of a gold vol enclosing a blue field bearing a white star charged with a red pentagon, one point down encircled by a blue annulet counterchanged; overall a red scroll at top inscribed "WARTIME" and a red scroll at bottom inscribed "READINESS" in gold letters.
 

Symbolism

Ultramarine blue is the primary color associated with aviation. The star symbolizes excellence, authority and command. It is combined with an annulet representing complete service and total readiness. The pentagon refers to the Command's location in the National Capital Area. Red, white and blue are our national colors. The golden wings allude to the Command's mission.
 

Background

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the U.S. Army Operational Support Airlift Command on 2 Jun 1992. It was redesignated for the Army National Guard Operational Support Airlift Command on 1 Sep 1994.
 

41st Army Band

Tab

A full color embroidered white tab with the inscription “FORTY-FIRST ARMY BAND” in scarlet 5/16 inch (.79 cm) letters, edged with a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) black border. The overall dimensions are 4 1/16 inches (10.24 cm) in length and 11/16 inch (1.75 cm) in width. Approved by TIOH on 28 May 2008. (TIOH Drawing A-1-969).
 
The Tabard, Mace Drum and Baldric all carry the same symbolism: The magnolia and trident design is based on the crest and the distinctive unit insignia of the Mississippi Army National Guard. The colors blue, white and red were suggested by the State Flag of Mississippi. The mace bears a wavy band representing the Mississippi River and a saltire design (X-shape) taken from the canton of the State Flag. The twenty white stars represent Mississippi, the twentieth state.

​Tabard

​Mace

​Drum

​Baldric

 
 
Revised: 8/4/2015 11:14