Heraldry

​155th Armored Brigade Combat Team
The 155th Armored Brigade Combat Team - "Dixie Thunder" carries the Traditional Designation"Dixie Thunder" as authorized by the U.S. Army Center of Military History on May 13, 2011.  The SSI is worn by all members of the 155 ABCT.  The DUI is worn by Soldiers assigned to the Headquarters & Headquarters Company only.  

 

Organizational Colors

The unit's organizational colors are the Coat of Arms with a background color based on branch as defined by Army Regulation 840-10: Flags, Guidons, Streamers, Tabards, and Automobile and Aircraft Plates.
 
 
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Shoulder Sleeve Insignia

Description

On a yellow shield, 3 inches (7.62 cm) in height and 2 inches (5.08 cm) in width overall, arched at the top and bottom, on a bend wavy green a white lightning bolt all within a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) green border.
 

Symbolism

The wavy bend refers to the Mississippi River. The lightning bolt symbolizes the striking power and shock action of the unit. Yellow and green are colors used for armored units.
 

Background

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 155th Armored Brigade on 21 February 1974. It was redesignated for the 155th Armored Brigade Combat Team with the description and symbolism updated on 25 July 2007. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-572)

Distinctive Unit Insignia

Description

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches (3.02 cm) in height overall consisting of a white saltire, the areas between the arms of the saltire starting at the top alternating green and black, issuing from base and surmounting overall a gold trident, the tines consisting of three thunderbolts, the arms of the saltire extending over the edge of a continuous gold scroll inscribed at the top "DIXIE" and in base "THUNDER" all in black letters.
 

Symbolism

The saltire, a symbol of strong support, was suggested by the canton of the State Flag of Mississippi. The trident a symbol of striking power appears in the crest of the Mississippi Army National Guard. The three tines of the trident simulating thunderbolts allude to the motto, "Dixie Thunder." The color black is symbolic of iron and strength. Yellow (gold) and green are colors used for armored units.
 

Background

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 155th Armored Brigade on 8 February 1974. It was redesignated for the 155th Armored Brigade Combat Team with the description updated on 25 July 2007.


1st Battalion, 155th Infantry Regiment

"Mississippi Rifles​​"

Organizational Colors

The unit's organizational colors are the Coat of Arms with a background color based on branch as defined by Army Regulation 840-10: Flags, Guidons, Streamers, Tabards, and Automobile and Aircraft Plates.
 
 
 
 

Distinctive Unit Insignia

Description

A Silver metal and enamel device 1 1/16 inches (2.70 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Azure, in bend a giant cactus and a fleur-de-lis paleways Or; on a chief Argent a saltire Gray surmounted by a cross Gules charged with an arrow fessways of the third. Attached below the shield a Silver scroll inscribed "STAND FAST" in Blue letters.
 

Symbolism

The shield is blue, the present Infantry color, and the chief is white, the old Infantry color. The arrow and cross represent Indian War and War of 1812 service. The cactus indicated the organization's service during the Mexican War. The gray saltire is for the organization's service as Confederate troops during the Civil War. World War I service is denoted by the fleur-de-lis. It is understood that Colonel Jefferson Davis, when commanding the troops at the Battle of Buena Vista, commanded, "Stand Fast, Mississippians," when other troops were beginning to fall back. The motto selected is taken from this command.
 

Background

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 4 June 1931.

Coat of Arms

Blazon

Shield: Azure, in bend a giant cactus and a fleur-de-lis paleways Or; on a chief Argent a saltire Gray surmounted by a cross Gules charged with an arrow fessways of the third.
 
Crest: That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Mississippi National Guard: On a wreath of the colors (Or and Azure) a slip of magnolia full flower with leaves Proper behind a trident Sable.
 
Motto: STAND FAST.
 

Symbolism

Shield: The shield is blue, the present Infantry color, and the chief is white, the old Infantry color. The arrow and cross represent Indian War and War of 1812 service. The cactus indicated the organization's service during the Mexican War. The gray saltire is for the organization's service as Confederate troops during the Civil War. World War I service is denoted by the fleur-de-lis. It is understood that Colonel Jefferson Davis, when commanding the troops at the Battle of Buena Vista, commanded, "Stand Fast, Mississippians," when other troops were beginning to fall back. The motto selected is taken from this command.
 
Crest: The crest is that of the Mississippi Army National Guard.
 

Background

The coat of arms was approved on 4 June 1931.
 

1st Squadron, 98th Cavalry Regiment

Organizational Colors

The unit's organizational colors are the Coat of Arms with a background color based on branch as defined by Army Regulation 840-1​​0: Flags, Guidons, Streamers, Tabards, and Automobile and Aircraft Plates.
 
 
 
 

Distinctive Unit Insignia

Description

A Silver color metal and enamel device 1 3/8 inches (3.49 cm) in width overall consisting of a shield blazoned as follows: Per bend sinister Gules and Argent, between in dexter chief a lightning flash bendwise Or and in sinister base a griffin's head erased Vert, a sinister bend wavy Azure (Flag Blue). Attached below and to the sides of the shield a Black motto scroll inscribed "MERIDIANUS ADAMANTINUS" in Silver.
 

Symbolism

Scarlet and white represent Cavalry and refer also to Recon Squadron associations. The wavy sinister bend represents Infantry and the Mississippi River, in the unit's home state. The yellow lightning flash refers to the unit's deployment to Iraq and represents the 155th Armored Brigade Combat Team. The green griffin's head represents the affiliation with the 198th Armor Regiment and firepower. Green refers to association with Armor.​
 

Background

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 11 June 2008.

Coat of Arms

Blazon

Shield: Per bend sinister Gules and Argent, between in dexter chief a lightning flash bendwise Or and in sinister base a griffin's head erased Vert, a sinister bend wavy Azure (Flag Blue).
 
Crest: That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Mississippi Army National Guard: From a wreath Argent and Gules, a slip of magnolia full flower with leaves Proper behind a trident Sable.
 
Motto: MERIDIANUS ADAMANTINUS (Southern Steel).
 

Symbolism

Shield: Scarlet and white represent Cavalry and refer also to Recon Squadron associations. The wavy sinister bend represents Infantry and the Mississippi River, in the unit's home state. The yellow lightning flash refers to the unit's deployment to Iraq and represents the 155th Armored Brigade Combat Team. The green griffin's head represents the affiliation with the 198th Armor Regiment and firepower. Green refers to association with Armor.
 
Crest: The crest is that of the Mississippi Army National Guard.
 

Background

The coat of arms was approved on 11 June 2008.

 

2d Battalion, 198th Armor Regiment

Organizational Colors

The unit's organizational colors are the Coat of Arms with a background color based on branch as defined by Army Regulation 840-1​​0: Flags, Guidons, Streamers, Tabards, and Automobile and Aircraft Plates.
 
 
 
 

Distinctive Unit Insignia

Description

A Gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned as follows: Or, a chevronel Gules, in base a dragon’s head erased Vert. Attached below and to the sides of the shield a Gold scroll inscribed “WE CAME TO FIGHT” in Red.
 

Symbolism

The shield is yellow (gold) for Armor. The up-thrusting chevronel and the armored dragon’s head refer to the aggressive and armored characteristics of the Regiment.
 

Background

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 198th Tank Battalion, Mississippi National Guard on 7 December 1951. It was redesignated for the 198th Armor Regiment, Mississippi Army National Guard on 13 June 1962.

Coat of Arms

Blazon

Shield: Or, a chevronel Gules, in base a dragon’s head erased Vert.
 
Crest: That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Mississippi Army National Guard: On a wreath of the colors Or and Gules, a slip of magnolia full flower with leaves Proper behind a trident Sable.
 
Motto: WE CAME TO FIGHT.
 

Symbolism

Shield: The shield is yellow (gold) for Armor. The up-thrusting chevronel and the armored dragon’s head refer to the aggressive and armored characteristics of the Regiment.
 
Crest: The crest is that of the Mississippi Army National Guard.
 

Background

The coat of arms was originally approved for the 198th Tank Battalion, Mississippi National Guard on 7 December 1951. It was redesignated for the 198th Armor Regiment, Mississippi Army National Guard and amended to change the symbolism on 13 June 1962.
 

2d Battalion, 114th Field Artillery Regiment

Organizational Colors

The unit's organizational colors are the Coat of Arms with a background color based on branch as defined by Army Regulation 840-10: Flags, Guidons, Streamers, Tabards, and Automobile and Aircraft Plates.
 
 
 
 

Distinctive Unit Insignia

Description

A Gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/16 inches (2.70 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Gules, a dragon’s head erased Or, langued Azure.
 

Symbolism

The shield is red for Artillery. The dragon overcame its adversaries by its fiery breath, therefore, the firing power of the Field Artillery is emphasized by the dragon’s head.
 

Background

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 114th Field Artillery Regiment on 25 September 1936. It was redesignated for the 114th Field Artillery Battalion on 7 September 1949. It was redesignated for the 114th Artillery Regiment on 19 July 1960. The insignia was redesignated for the 114th Field Artillery Regiment on 1 August 1972. The insignia was amended to update the description on 1 November 2004.

Coat of Arms

Blazon

Shield: Gules, a dragon’s head erased Or, langued Azure.
 
Crest: That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Mississippi Army National Guard: On a wreath of the colors, Or and Gules, a slip of magnolia, full flower, with leaves Proper, behind a trident Sable.
 
Motto: AD SUMMA VIRTUS (Courage To The Last).
 

Symbolism

Shield: The shield is red for Artillery. The dragon overcame its adversaries by its fiery breath, therefore, the firing power of the Field Artillery is emphasized by the dragon’s head.
 
Crest: The crest is that of the Mississippi Army National Guard.
 

Background

The coat of arms was originally approved for the 114th Field Artillery Regiment on 25 September 1936. It was redesignated for the 114th Field Artillery Battalion on 7 September 1949. It was redesignated for the 114th Artillery Regiment on 19 July 1960. The insignia was redesignated for the 114th Field Artillery Regiment on 1 August 1972. The coat of arms was amended to correct the motto on 1 November 2004.
 

106th Support Battalion

Organizational Colors

The unit's organizational colors are the Coat of Arms with a background color based on branch as defined by Army Regulation 840-10: Flags, Guidons, Streamers, Tabards, and Automobile and Aircraft Plates.
 
 
 
 

Distinctive Unit Insignia

Description

A Silver color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Buff a bend wavy between a mullet and a fret Azure, in dexter chief on a canton Gules a saltire of the second. Attached below and to the sides of the shield a Silver scroll inscribed “WE SHALL PROVIDE” in Blue letters.
 

Symbolism

Buff and scarlet are the colors used for Support. The star, symbolic of leadership, and the fret, denoting a strong support system, represent the overall mission and capabilities of the organization. The canton refers to the Mississippi State Flag connoting allotment to that State. The wavy bend alludes to the Pearl River flowing by Monticello, the unit’s home station.
 

Background

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 23 September 1975.

Coat of Arms

Blazon

Shield: Buff a bend wavy between a mullet and a fret Azure, all fimbriated Argent, in dexter chief on a canton Gules a saltire of the second fimbriated of the third.
 
Crest: That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Mississippi Army National Guard: On a wreath of the colors (Argent and Gules) a slip of magnolia full flower with leaves Proper behind a trident Sable.
 
Motto: WE SHALL PROVIDE.
 

Symbolism

Shield: Buff and scarlet are the colors used for Support. The star, symbolic of leadership, and the fret, denoting a strong support system, represent the overall mission and capabilities of the organization. The canton refers to the Mississippi State Flag connoting allotment to that State. The wavy bend alludes to the Pearl River flowing by Monticello, the unit’s home station.
 
Crest: The crest is that of the Mississippi Army National Guard.
 

Background

The coat of arms was approved on 23 June 1975.
 

150th Engineer Battalion

Organizational Colors

The unit's organizational colors are the Coat of Arms with a background color based on branch as defined by Army Regulation 840-10: Flags, Guidons, Streamers, Tabards, and Automobile and Aircraft Plates.
 
 
 
 

Distinctive Unit Insignia

Description

A Silver color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches (3.02 cm) in width overall blazoned as follows: Azure, a pale bretessed and double-parted Argent surmounted by a gauntlet closed, palm inward Argent (Silver Gray), charged on the sleeve with two mullets in pale Gules; on a chief of the like, ajourné of the third, a bowie knife fesswise, point to dexter of the last. Attached below a Red scroll inscribed “HONOR IS OUR STRENGTH” in Silver.
 

Symbolism

Red, white, and blue are the nation’s colors and the colors of the Mississippi flag. The pale parted suggests railroad tracks, denoting the City of Meridian, which was founded at the junction of several railroad lines and the home state of the Brigade. The gauntlet represents strength and symbolizes the call sign used by the Headquarters, “Knight.” The stars signify the Battalion’s combat deployment during World War II and Operation Iraqi Freedom. The chief with the separations illustrates the battlements of a castle and suggests the unit’s lineage to the 150th Engineer Battalion. The four merlons commemorate the four soldiers of the 150th Engineer who lost their lives during Operation Iraqi Freedom: MSG Sean Cooley, SGT Robert McNail, SSG Larry Arnold and SGT Terrence Lee. The bowie knife indicates the Battalion’s association to the 155th Armored Brigade Combat Team.
 

Background

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the Special Troops Battalion, 155th Armored Brigade Combat Team on 18 April 2008, and redesignated effective 5 October 2016 for the 150th Engineer Battalion with the symbolism updated.

Coat of Arms

Blazon

Shield: Azure, a pale bretessed and double-parted Argent surmounted by a gauntlet closed, palm inward Argent (Silver Gray), edged of the first, charged on the sleeve with two mullets in pale Gules; on a chief of the last, ajourné Argent, a bowie knife fesswise, point to dexter Argent (Silver Gray).
 
Crest: That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Mississippi Army National Guard: On a wreath of the colors (Argent and Gules) a slip of magnolia full flower with leaves Proper behind a trident Sable.
 
Motto: HONOR IS OUR STRENGTH.
 

Symbolism

Shield: Red, white, and blue are the nation’s colors and the colors of the Mississippi flag. The pale parted suggests railroad tracks, denoting the City of Meridian, which was founded at the junction of several railroad lines and the home state of the Brigade. The gauntlet represents strength and symbolizes the call sign used by the Headquarters, “Knight.” The red stars signify the Battalion’s combat deployment during World War II and Operation Iraqi Freedom. The chief with the separations illustrates the battlements of a castle and suggests the unit’s lineage to the 150th Engineer Battalion. The four merlons commemorate the four soldiers of the 150th Engineer who lost their lives during Operation Iraqi Freedom: MSG Sean Cooley, SGT Robert McNail, SSG Larry Arnold and SGT Terrence Lee. The bowie knife indicates the Battalion’s association to the 155th Armored Brigade Combat Team.
 
Crest: The crest is that of the Mississippi Army National Guard.
 

Background

The coat of arms was originally approved for the Special Troops Battalion, 155th Armored Brigade Combat Team on 18 April 2008, and redesignated effective 5 October 2016 for the 150th Engineer Battalion with the symbolism updated.
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Revised: 2/23/2018 7:46